Poem about the 7 stages of life

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poem about the 7 stages of life

The Seven Ages of Man by William Shakespeare

All the worlds a stage,
And all the men and women merely players,
They have their exits and entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurses arms.
Then, the whining schoolboy with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour, sudden, and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannons mouth. And then the justice
In fair round belly, with good capon lind,
With eyes severe, and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws, and modern instances,
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slipperd pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose, and pouch on side,
His youthful hose well savd, a world too wide,
For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice,
Turning again towards childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.


One of the first poem of Shakespeare I have ever read & definitely the best among others! The words can be easily read & understood & its not in the typical Shakespearean English.. I remember the time when we were reading it in our poetry class at English Department & I instantly fell in love with its meaning ^_^
Seriously.. Shakespeare couldnt have described the stages of a mans life in other words than these.. :)
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The Seven Ages of Man Summary and Explanation by William Shakespeare

All the world's a stage

English for Students. At first the infant, Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms. Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel And shining morning face, creeping like snail Unwillingly to school. And then the lover, Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier. Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard, Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel, Seeking the bubble reputation Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice, In fair round belly with good capon lined, With eyes severe and beard of formal cut, Full of wise saws and modem instances; And so he plays his part.

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Through the voice of Jacques, Shakespeare sends out a profound message about life and our role in it. In this drama of life, each one of us plays seven distinct roles. This, the author says, is the Seven Ages of Man. These seven roles begin at birth and end with death. Birthmarks the entry of man in the first stage of life. An infant in the caretaker's arms is just a helpless child learning to survive. Babies communicate with us through their cries.

"All the world's a stage" is the phrase that begins a monologue from William Shakespeare's pastoral comedy As You Like It, spoken by the melancholy Jaques in Act II Scene VII Line The speech compares the world to a stage and life to a play and catalogues the seven stages of a man's life, Juvenal, the ancient Roman poet, wrote one of the earliest versions of this.
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John Knight

This is where his formal education starts but he is not entirely happy with school. His mother is ambitious for him and has washed his face thoroughly before sending him off to school but he goes very slowly and reluctantly. He is sentimental, sighing and writing poems to girls, making himself a bit ridiculous. He works on developing his reputation and takes risks to that end. He enjoys the finer things of life, like good food.

1 thoughts on “The Seven Ages of Man by William Shakespeare

  1. All the world's a stage, / And all the men and women merely players; / They have their exits and The poem presents a somewhat nihilistic, hopeless view of life.

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